Tag Archives: yoga

The Club is open, yoga is on and the garden is busy. Sort of …

The Club is open, yoga is on and the garden is busy. Sort of …

It’s been a weird few months hasn’t it?  And we’re never going back to the way it was, are we?  Too many thoughts have helped us all see the world a little differently and Covid-19 will be here for a while.  But we can still live!

On Monday 11 May there will be a partial lifting of lock-down guidelines and you can read about that here.  The Nature Club can have a partial opening.  That’s good because nature is a complimentary therapy for  mental and physical health, so join The Club!  May is a beautiful time to walk the river.  Bluebells are fragrant, rhododendrons are boomin’ and the brambles haven’t yet taken over.  We started to look at mowing the path (video), but after cutting some branches across the way we decided that it didn’t need it yet and just drove home.  Please drop a line if you’re planning a visit as we want to help maintain social distancing while uncertainties linger.  We’re also looking at gatherings in The Tent, but want to keep numbers under control. There’s plenty of space to have a yoga session for a dozen people, but a full-on concert would be asking for trouble!

Continue reading The Club is open, yoga is on and the garden is busy. Sort of …

How to change the world: Change your mind, body and spirit.

Joe Dispenza has been elucidating the science of mind for decades.  In this talk (embedded below) he gives a clear, easy to follow description of how the mind works and how a person can change themselves by, literally, changing their mind.

To summarise: The brain is constantly changing – the growth, decay, connection and disconnection of neurons is the electro-chemical, physical manifestation of mind.  Recognising one’s own thoughts allows you to manage them in a positive way, rather than allowing them to propagate chaotically.  (This is why cognitive behavioural therapy works, even to the extent of being a go to treatment for clinical depression.) So, when faced with stress or challenge, you pause, take a breath, consider the situation and look for positive aspects, which includes taking a different approach.  Taking a positive approach lowers stress (good), and allows the mind to think more critically to find solutions (good) instead of resorting to primitive, knee-jerk responses.

People who are seeking change in the world or themselves will appreciate the scientific foundation of these ideas, which have been practices for centuries by yogis, monks and ascetics.  The technique is also used, whether consciously or not, by successful people who control their behaviour – this includes academics,  athletes and sportspeople, musicians, thespians, entrepreneurs and organisation leaders.

As well as using your mind as a simple tool for changing yourself, recognising your biological nature allows you to choose a path which yields happiness and health.  This happens when you manage stress to allow your physical body to move to equanimity.

These ideas are very relevant for those of us who are seeking  system change.  Often our efforts are blocked by intransigence in  incumbent institutions, systems and leaders – and that is frustrating and exhausting.  Getting stressed is not a solution.  Stepping back, letting go and moving forward in the right way is the only way to effect positive change.  We are changing the system by changing ourselves.  To change the world, we must change ourselves.  It is not easy because the system is designed for dysfunction, but changing for good works, gets easier as you do it more and yields a fulfilling life.  Think about it!  And be the change you want to see in the world.

Enjoy the show:

Yoga In Ireland – groundbreaking analysis of market and practitioner behaviour.

Check out Pam’s article,  The Irish Yoga Market, published in Yoga Therapy Ireland Magazine, Spring 2015.

Pam’s ground breaking research acquired raw data on the yoga market in Ireland which was previously unavailable and focuses on why people do yoga.

The research included lengthy interviews with a number of teachers and leading yoga entrepreneurs, plus a wide ranging questionnaire filled in by hundreds of practitioners around the country.

As a yoga practitioner, teacher and entrepreneur herself she wanted to consider assumptions about why people do yoga, such as: “Is it for health or self-esteem or social fun?”

Her work explored  questions fundamental to an effective marketing plan:

  • Who is the target client?

  • How can the client be helped?

  • What attracts the target customer?

  • What new market segments can be developed?

These are not the first questions that pop into mind when you think of “yoga”, but they are important to sustainable business success.  The article offers insights in to how to grow your yoga business.

Please download the article from pambutleryoga.com here.

Mr. BKS Iyengar’s Light shines on

Like millions of others, I have been influenced by this great yoga teacher, though I have never met him. I have read The Tree of Yoga. I refer to Light on Yoga and Light on Pranayama. I study Light on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. I use props to aid my alignment. I am aware that yoga is a strong discipline, not a casual affair. I find something in today’s practice that was better than yesterday’s practice. Thank you, Guruji, for the great gifts you gave us.

“When I practice, I am a philosopher,
When I teach, I am a scientist,
When I demonstrate, I am an artist.”
BKS Iyengar

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-28862979