Category Archives: 2 Geopolitics

Numbers That Matter – COP21

Is the scale of marches for change today a significant number?  They are certainly the largest individual marches and the largest globally coordinated march, and the first to include a virtual march which allowed people to participate without travelling long distance.

Marching (without marching) - the Avaaz virtual march. https://secure.avaaz.org/en/paris_virtual_march/
Marching (without marching) – the Avaaz virtual march.
https://secure.avaaz.org/en/paris_virtual_march/

They say about 600,000 marched (excluding virtual marchers) around the world. That’s a lot of people bothering to go out to do a chore.

Maybe the number is higher.  There are more on virtual marches.  And many who were there in thought and spirit if not body.

It might not be enough. Politicians listen to money.  Businesses might see opportunities, but are good at greenwash and we’re good at being blind-sided by advertising and mod cons – phones to cars, fast food to fast clothes, … must haves?

So we must remember tomorrow that we must still say no to more than enough.  Less consumption.  Less flying and driving.  Less packaging and chemicals.  Less deception and greed.  It’s easy.  We all know what to do if we think.

Does it matter?

Yes, in many ways.  Climate is just one.  Everything is connected.  We must change the system to bring dignity to humanity, fix the financial system, clean up the food system, stop the waste of corruption and redress the pain of war.

melting-EarthLooking at climate alone, the temperature rise since 1850 has been 1 o C, while 2 o C is agreed ‘gateway’ to dangerous global warming.  We’re well on the way to tipping point, if not there already.
We can emit up to 565 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide.  At this rate we’ll have done that in 15 years.  That means we’ve got 15 years to stop, not we’ve got to stop in 15 years.  By the way, oil companies have in their current reserves 2,795 gigatonnes worth of carbon dioxide – so they have an incentive to sell that stuff, which will kill the planet as we know it.  (Living on Mars might be better…)  And just so you know how much they want it the CEO of Exxon gets paid $100,000 a day, yes a DAY.  And you’re paying it.
There’s been a 4% decline in Arctic sea ice per decade since 1979
9 out of the 10 hottest years on record have occurred since 2000

It’s not a debate.  If you’re smart it’s immoral to question whether humans are the cause or if fossil fuels are the problem.

There are other important facts.  Like that the human population has doubled while half the wildlife has been wiped out in my life.  Like the 30 million millionaires owning more than 3 billion people.  Like the suicide rate among farmers.  Like not being able to afford the food you buy.  It’s not about religion.  We’re all in this together.  It’s crazy.  We need common sense.  We need to take a breath and do the right thing the right way.

We need to say no to the bad things and use alternatives.  Drive less, travel less, turn the thermostat down, eat less junk, throw away less (and don’t buy it in the first place), cheat less, …  Eat more veg, run and bike more, say sorry, say I’m wrong, be with family and friends more.  And if we’re in charge, we’ve really got to do better.  We all are part of the system and we need to change the system.

Avaaz.org

350.org

Terrorism to Happiness – connecting the dots

main_900The news seems to be as bleak as ever, … but the outlook is worse.

There have always been stories of blood, death, corruption and pollution but now the consequences are more global and terminal.  There is even a rationale argument that we are past tipping point, but I choose to believe that there is still time to change.

Humans are clearly amazing.  Just look around you to see the conveniences and contrivances that make life easy and enjoyable.  You’re probably reading this on a computer or phone.  Isn’t that fantastic?!corruption

And we’re lovely, especially when we’ve had enough to eat and we’re in a good mood.  We’re creative – art, music, dance – and innovative.

So how come the systems for peace and justice don’t seem to work?  How come the food we buy is poisoned with chemicals?  How come the clothes we wear are made by slaves?  How come we’re on top and others are below?

Because we’ve stopped being human.  We’ve stopped thinking and regressed to primitive instinct and are prodded by rules and advertising to lie and steal.  That is a black and white caricature, but it is closer to the truth than we admit.la-sci-sn-china-exports-air-pollution-united-s-001

And how did we get this way?

We looked at our neighbour’s stuff and wanted more.  We didn’t care they are the same as us.  Or that we’ve pretty much got the same.  Or that in order to get the stuff you have to give up really living.  We were duped in to thinking that sitting on a throne is more enjoyable than hanging out with friends.

Water Pollution image in Haina, Dominican Republic - water pollution images -5How did that happen? Fear and greed.  That’s OK, because it’s natural.  At the beginning instinct and survival rule.  That model is fine at the beginning, when the beast is starting to develop language and tools.  That time has passed.      Now it’s about civilisation.  We have moved beyond survival, egocentric, controlling, strategic, even tested consensus models.  But all of our systems have been exclusive.  About US and THEM.  And now it’s about more than US or THEM, it’s about more than US and THEM.  It’s about everything.

Everything is connected from politics to environment, from work to play, from business to family.  So we must use all we know and move beyond exclusive thinking to inclusive thinking.

atomtoworld2

This starts with putting yourself in the other person’s shoes.

If you don’t want to be … hit, bombed, starved, underpaid, overworked, abused, cheated or lied to, stolen from, … then don’t do those things.  And that means all people, and animals too.  And realise that plants are the foundation of life so treat them well.astraeaspiral2

There are responsibilities too.  About compassion and generosity to others, about working when you’re getting paid to work, about openness and disclosure, about care for other’s stuff.

It all sounds so simple.  Do the right thing the right way.  It’s actually not that hard.  It even feels good sometimes.

But we don’t all behave that way.  We don’t because of ignorance or complacency.  Sometimes it’s peer pressure.  But when we’re at the top, there’s no excuse.  Then we’re just choosing to be corrupt and corrupt the system.

It’s quite clear that we do have the means and understanding to give people the minimum resources and guidance to lead fulfilled lives.  eatingmoneyBut we don’t do that.  Half the world starves, a few million (say 30 million people, or less than half a percent (< 0.5%)) have more than that bottom half.  You can see that we’ve chosen that because the evidence is all around.  We all get to choose the way we live, the stuff we buy, the talk we talk, the jobs we do and when you add it all up, … you get what we’ve got.   That’s common sense right?!

We can change.  We can do things differently.  We could grow up.  We could do the things we’re supposed to.  We could give more, take less.  Be more open, honest.  Stop consuming when you’ve had enough.  Understand the connection between your choice to buy … food, clothes, furniture, toys, transport, holidays, homes, cars, votes … and the consequences for other people and for the life of earth.

People don’t want to blow themselves up.  They might do it out of desperation or ignorance.  But they’d rather have a decent life.  So deliver resource to live, work and play, deliver education and technology and the freedom to choose.  Choose to share.

World-Peace

Are you beginning to get it? The what, why and how of system change.

parisattack20151115There has been an outpouring of love and solidarity because of the tragic and terrific blood-letting in Paris this weekend.  It has been a synchronous focus on thought, feeling and action by millions around the world.  That is good.

The answers proposed have ranged from black to white, from vengeance to forgiveness.  (My preference is at the “healing the wounds” end of the spectrum, rather than at the “ripping more flesh apart” end.)  The personal grief is inevitably traumatic.  The reasons for young people to wreak blood and havoc and kill themselves are difficult to imagine, let alone comprehend.  But there are answers – there must be: we are humans and we can do it all.atomtoworld2

So what will we choose?

Walking around the garden as the light fades and the wind builds to another stormy night, it seems clear that the warnings are coming thick and fast.  It seems as though everyday another report comes in of violence, terror, corruption and injustice, and of storm, drought, flood, habitat destruction and species loss.  You can  see, hear, feel the immorality of human systems and the pain of nature.  Do we look, listen, touch?

There are two kinds of people: People who can see what’s going on and do something about it (i.e. you, people with access to media, educated etc).  The more resources they have, the more they can do something about it.  The other kind of people who are those who are too poor to be able to know what’s going on (most people know corruption when they see it and crazy weather when it passes), or if they do, live subsistence lives so have fewer choices.

It is increasingly evident that of those of us who can act, some act and others don’t.  Some have realised that the system must change and others continue to turn a blind eye.  Those who have realised it start with awareness and gradually start to change their behaviour, from diet to lifestyle to job to investment, commitment and philanthropy.

eatingmoneyOthers who turn a blind eye, should open them.  Elites – the people who influence and control human system (millionaires etc) – seem to be predominantly in the blind eye department.  That’s bad.

It must be that rich people are ignoring the obvious because they are the ones that determine the system, which is not working, and they remain largely ignorant of how to change the system and what to change it to.  Even when the how and what are obvious, admission of the need and course are slow, implementation is sluggish and patchy.

Here’s a quick example:  behaviour change is nurtured with education,  but education systems are well behind the curve. (Many observe that terrorism is inculcated by misinformation which would be hindered if critical thinking, even thinking, was a basic product of universal education.)

And a biosphere dysfunction example: 2015 is the hottest year on record and climate has risen 1 degree already yet fossil fuel companies are still subsidised and the so called “Sustainable Development Goals” are still talking about growth.

That’s the situation in a nutshell.  Things are bad.  We know how to change.  Too few of the people at the top are changing.

That’s a dangerous recipe.  You, like me, can make a difference.  Let’s all take a step in the right direction.  Slow down.  Take a breath.  Say sorry.  Change the system from fear and greed to love and sharing.  Do it now.  May be we’ve still got time.world02

Cyborgs are coming to take your job, especially if you’re young.

The prospect of your job being automated is increasing.  The convergence of neuroscience, computing, biology and engineering has already made robotic prosthetics a reality and everyone carries a small thinking machine so that they can remember phone numbers, birthdays etc (media device/phone).monkeytorobot

We are certainly choosing a future in which we don’t work.  We haven’t addressed the consequences in a thoughtful way evidenced by the unchanged platitudes by politicians, ongoing agglomeration of industry and commerce (get big to survive) with its attendant pyramid of wages (little at the bottom, inconceivable wealth at the top) and public education systems still modelled on the factory.

Continue reading Cyborgs are coming to take your job, especially if you’re young.

Everyone is good, but our world is unethical. How come?

Everyone is good, yet somehow the product of our civilisation is often pain and suffering.

More people are becoming aware that something needs to change and are even doing something about it.  Simply talking about the challenges is a start, while others initiate changes in behaviour such as what they eat or wear.  But engaging a big picture perspective is difficult and can seem futile because the system seems dysfunctional.

The text below is from a blog about morals (personal) and ethics (system) which is a short read offering insight in to the nature of the problem.  Perhaps having read it you might contrive ways in which you can contribute to system enlightenment in your work and life, before this civilisation implodes like all those before it.  Enjoy …

Extract from Ethics 101: The difference between ethics and morals by Ian Welsh

 Our current ethical system requires politicians to act unethically, to do great harm to people they don’t know, while protecting those they do.  This can hardly be denied, and was on display in the 2007/8 financial collapse and the bailout after.  The millions of homeowners and employees politicians and central bankers did not know were not helped, and the people the politicians and central bankers and treasury officials did know, were bailed out.  Austerity, likewise, has hurt people politicians don’t know, while enriching the corporate officers and rich they do know.

Continue reading Everyone is good, but our world is unethical. How come?

You have the power to change the world. Choose!

Words by Charlie Chaplin.  Contemporary images.  The choice is clear.  Have you chosen yet?  Or are you still chasing the machine?  Choose humanity, while the choice remains …

 

The Great Dictator‘s Speech (1940)

I’m sorry, but I don’t want to be an emperor. That’s not my business. I don’t want to rule or conquer anyone. I should like to help everyone if possible- Jew, Gentile, black men, white…

We all want to help one another. Human beings are like that. We want to live by each others’ happiness, not by each other’s misery. We don’t want to hate and despise one another. In this world there is room for everyone. And the good earth is rich and can provide for everyone. The way of life can be free and beautiful, but we have lost the way.

Greed has poisoned men’s souls; has barricaded the world with hate; has goose-stepped us into misery and bloodshed. We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want. Our knowledge has made us cynical; our cleverness, hard and unkind.

We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery ,we need humanity. More than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost. The aeroplane and the radio have brought us closer together. The very nature of these inventions cries out for the goodness in man; cries out for universal brotherhood; for the unity of us all.

Even now my voice is reaching millions throughout the world, millions of despairing men, women, and little children, victims of a system that makes men torture and imprison innocent people.

To those who can hear me, I say “Do not despair.”

The misery that is now upon us is but the passing of greed, the bitterness of men who fear the way of human progress. The hate of men will pass, and dictators die, and the power they took from the people will return to the people. And so long as men die, liberty will never perish.

Soldiers! Don’t give yourselves to brutes, men who despise you and enslave you; who regiment your lives, tell you what to do, what to think and what to feel! Who drill you, diet you, treat you like cattle, use you as cannon fodder!

Don’t give yourselves to these unnatural men—machine men with machine minds and machine hearts! You are not machines! You are not cattle! You are men! You have a love of humanity in your hearts! You don’t hate!

Only the unloved hate; the unloved and the unnatural.

Soldiers! Don’t fight for slavery! Fight for liberty!

In the seventeenth chapter of St. Luke, it’s written “the kingdom of God is within man”, not one man nor a group of men, but in all men! In you! You, the people, have the power, the power to create machines, the power to create happiness! You, the people, have the power to make this life free and beautiful, to make this life a wonderful adventure. Then in the name of democracy, let us use that power.

Let us all unite.

Let us fight for a new world, a decent world that will give men a chance to work, that will give youth a future and old age a security. By the promise of these things, brutes have risen to power. But they lie! They do not fulfill their promise. They never will!

Dictators free themselves but they enslave the people!

Now let us fight to fulfill that promise! Let us fight to free the world! To do away with national barriers! To do away with greed, with hate and intolerance!

Let us fight for a world of reason, a world where science and progress will lead to all men’s happiness.

Soldiers, in the name of democracy, let us all unite!

Good people are dying. It’s going to get worse before it gets better.

screenshot-baltimore-riot-001-04272015Tension is rising is the USA.   Two US police officers were shot dead in Mississippi.  Last week.a New York police officer  was shot in the head while questioning a suspect from his police car.  And riots bubbled in Baltimore after a suspect died in police custody.  The mood is confused and angry.

The issue is justice.  Minorities in America (non-whites, females, etc) have been depreciated by law and culture for too long.  The solutions of education, jobs, and infrastructure have been neglected in favour of guns and incarceration.

System change is afoot.  We can choose a soft landing by opening up opportunities, sharing resources, and the “rich giving to the poor”.  Even if we do, cynicism and history means people will be sceptical of change for a while.  But the longer we continue using command and control approaches the worse it will get.

medrefugeesIn Europe, refugees are dying by hundreds as they try to escape feudal regimes, bereft of opportunity.  Many are people like us – farmers, teachers, postal workers, shop keepers, even doctors and engineers.  We can do more to stop them drowning, though, the real solution is again to promote education, infrastructure and jobs while reducing access to guns.

As long as we continue to turn a blind eye to unethical behaviour in the middle east, even to the extent of investing in weapons, the violence will continue.  As long as we allow capital and corporal punishment in our own judicial systems the global moral compass will continue to spin.

nepal-quakeWe can’t stop earthquakes, like the recent one in Nepal.  But we spent fewer, even no, resources on weapons, there would be more for education, infrastructure and jobs and emergency supplies for inevitable tragedies which will become more invasive as climate change and biodiversity loss impacts food supplies and our habitat.

Sadly, the push back against ignorance, immorality and injustice is going to get worse.  The sooner global cultural enlightenment can emerge the sooner humankind’s destruction of our own living systems will be reversed.

On a happier note, dancing helps as Dimitri Reeves showed …. so let’s show a bit of love.dimitrireevesdancing

BBC: Baltimore riots: ‘Without change more cities will burn’

BBC: Nepal Earthquake

www.DimitriReeves.com

CO2 levels exceed safe limit globally. Another sign we’ve broken the biosphere.

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Noaa) reported that global carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have reached 400 parts per million – levels that haven’t been seen for about two million years!

world02Isn’t it wonderful that a little monkey can upset nature so violently?!  We wield such power!

CO2 has risen more than 120 parts per million since pre-industrial times and half of that rise has occurred since 1980.  That’s a spike that isn’t going to slow down unless we CHANGE BEHAVIOUR.

In case you’re wondering, that means fewer people, consuming less.  Reversing the population explosion isn’t going to happen tomorrow, but everyone can cut their consumption by eating less meat (livestock farming is the #1 cause of climate change), travelling less (for work or pleasure), lowering the amount of chems we use on our selves (cosmetics) and our homes (laundry, detergents etc).

On the other hand we can love nature more, enjoy the company of friends,  and feel better about our world, … while we still have it.

BBC: CO2 levels reach monthly record

 

UK Election Exposes Shocking Social Chasm

It happens that as the UK goes to the polls today many marginal constituencies are based in rural areas and expose an unexpected economic vacuum throughout the economy.

The numbers are striking.  Very wealthy people live next to swathes of people surviving on charity who would rather work but jobs are scarce and low paid.

The Cotswolds charm tens of millions of tourists each year. It is a place that provides a rural sanctuary for billionaires.   ….  but it is the hub for many more who are in such a financial crisis that they are unable to feed themselves.

Maybe the issue is not about red or blue, labour or conservative, but about a system change in which it is recognised that the city is dead without its hinterland, that people need work however much automation is available and that the gulf between rich and poor is not about equality but about fairness, justice, equity.   Human beings need sustenance and love.

BBC:  Election 2015: What’s important for rural voters?

Sapiens: Thinking, Stories and Ignorance, then choosing to die.

Yuval Harari’s brief history of humankind, weighing in at a meaty 400 pages, is enjoyable, provocative and very worrying.  The wide-ranging, scholarly story is easy to read and sensible.  I enjoyed the book from beginning to end, though I had to restrain myself from skipping to the last chapter: The End of Homo Sapiens.

For the first few chapters, the irony of our vain self-naming “sapiens” (wise in Latin) is palpable on every page .  We wiped out at least six other species of hominid, not because we were better, stronger or smarter, but because we believed in things that didn’t exist, imagined collaboration and ran amok.

Skipping to the end of the book, the stories that we’ve imagined (like a bearded man in the clouds) stand in the way of common sense.  We believe what we want to believe, not what we know to be true.  We believe advertisements instead of our own personal senses and experiences.  We believe in the virtue of power despite evidence that it is corrupt.  And everyday, with increasing speed, we choose a virtual reality of thinking machines and media devices which lead to a life without nature and the inevitable rise of cyborgs which are stronger, smarter and more emotionally astute that homo sapiens.  That time, presaged by the approaching technological singularity, is happening now.  In a few decades, humankind will be on the way down … unless we choose to live within the laws of nature.

Buy Sapiens and enjoy the story.  It’s about you!