Category Archives: 8 Activities and Media

Bounce, Wobble, Smile – Ballin Temple notes at solstice

Bounce, wobble, spin – the solstice is here. And so the cycle continues.

Today is the day we’ve been looking forward to for a couple of months now. In the northern hemisphere, it’s the shortest day of the year and within a few days we’ll begin to notice the days lengthening again. Solstice is the root of the various festivities that occur at this time, like Christmas and Hanukkah, and increasingly it is celebrated for its own sake as more people reconnect with the natural cycles of our planet. That’s a good thing and it offers a contrast to the frighteningly consumerist nature of this time of year. Adverts on TV, emails asking for donations or promoting consumption and an extraordinary pile of “items” in the supermarket which will join the landfill before long are ironically in direct contrast to the spirit of the Christian Christmas. We are lucky to escape some of that commercialism as we live in a remote place.

The good side of this season is that family and friends gather, which we should do more regularly during the rest of the year. This gathering and goodwill is a wonderful opportunity to do things other than the daily grind, reflect on one’s situation and the coming year and liberate the better qualities of humanity. We are playing that game today as we tidy up and prepare for the arrival of family and friends over the coming week.

This is the time of year for reflection. It’s natural to do so since the earth is cool and quiet, birdsong is muted and the slowdown in natural cycles offers the opportunity to prepare for the coming spring. In many ways the past year has been “sad” to use a comical expression popularised by the Tweeter in Chief as nature has been further brutalised, environmental protection has been deprioritised and our economic and political systems have continued to widen inequality among people and between humanity and the rest of nature.

There might be a positive side to the regression that has been seen in the headlines: People are a beginning to notice and even change a little. Simple things like avoiding over packaged and out of season food, a bit more exercise and mindfulness (Pam really is a good yoga teacher who will help you feel parts of your body that you didn’t know existed, as I find out more and more!), and becoming more aware that a top down control model of society is not what we want, even if we are higher up the ladder than others. We are finding out that democracy without thought cultivates demagogues (as Socrates warned) and capitalism’s dark side is becoming ever more present as organisations amass control over public resources and our personal choices, even in rich countries – who would have though that the standard of living for those with less opportunity (say the lower 25% income bracket) has declined in the past decades!? So perhaps in the coming year more people will look up and ask “what is it really all for?” “how can I be more human?” “what can I do to make a difference?”

Our connection to nature is smothered by the technologically advanced virtual world we have chosen, from climate controlled buildings, to cars, planes and trains to whisk us hither and thither, to mod cons, to packaged food, to computers and mobile phones which allow us to communicate without facing another person. It seems normal, but it’s not natural – we’ve adapted well. But to live, rather than merely exist, our spirits need succour and that means connecting to real people and touching real nature. Enjoy that while we can.

So, if you want to touch nature, join us next week when we’ll host our Walk in the Woods here. We enjoy the gathering of people who we otherwise might not meet and many of whom we see too infrequently. The atmosphere in the woods and along the river seems to lift everyone’s spirits. Children enjoy clambering over logs and squishing through mud. Tea afterwards is accompanied by chat and laughter as friends catch up. We love it.

And if you like our eclectic perspective please stay in touch, join a yoga class, come for a holiday in nature, or read about how new perspectives can liberate your spirit.

Bounce, wobble, smile.

Pam and Tom

My excuse for being lazy …

My excuse for being lazy is thinking up new ideas.

So why would I admit to laziness?

Guilt.  It’s increasingly clear that people are amazing.  Not just celebrities on TV, also regular people.  People who make our lives better,. People who work hard for family and friends and good causes.  Shop owners, tradespeople, “employees”,  and people who don’t have work, resources, maybe even friends, who share their talents and energy to help others.  Real people.  That’s a challenge to follow.  So I’m feeling a bit guilty.

And what were these ideas that I took time off to think up? Continue reading My excuse for being lazy …

Drawdown – a comprehensive plan to reverse global warming

Paul Hawken has edited Drawdown,  a comprehensive review and analysis of tangible actions that can mitigate the destruction of the natural environment which is now being precipitated by anthropogenic pollution and is most visible in global warming.  Drawdown is the work of many professionals collaborating to synthesise practical mitigation actions.

Yesterday he collaborated with The Security and Sustainability Forum to present a summary of the book via webinar.  The video is shared below and you can follow through the slides shared by Edward Saltzberg MD of SSF here: https://www.slideshare.net/esaltzberg/drawdown-60-minutes-with-paul-hawken  The slides include summary financial and carbon data of the impact of various remedies.

Drawdown – 60 Minutes with Paul Hawken from Security & Sustainability Forum

Our Suicide is Painless

Yesterday was an unusual day filled with seemingly inane chores that had to be done.  I was arriving back home in the afternoon with groceries for guests and planned to turn the hay.   I drove past a field adjacent to our where a tractor was spraying and turned in to the drive to be greeted by a distasteful, though recognisable, toxic smell.

“Damn!”

Usually I’d just accept that that landowner had to spray to make a living, but I didn’t like the idea that our hay was being contaminated while it was looking so good.  Unusually, I decided to take another angle, dropped the bags on the kitchen floor, said “Hi!” to guests and spun the car around back up to the field.

After working out which row the tractor was in I walked up to the driver, who kindly stopped and helped me get n touch with the landowner.

The driver said the spray  was only to stop “disease”.

The landowner said it was only to stop “disease”.

They both said it was “OK”.

The contractor couldn’t come back on a still day because he had to empty the tanks since the pesticide had been paid for.  The wind might die down so he could wait a bit.  I knew the spray would still be sprayed, and would drift.  Hopefully little would drift, though you could see a 20  metre tail behind the tractor and smell it quarter of a kilometre away.

I asked what it was.  “I dunno.  Let’s have a look.”

So we did. It was Imtrex.

Imtrex – dead fish, dead tree, dead human …

“Wow.  Look at the labels on it! Dead fish.  Dead tree.  Heart attack.  C’mon! This can’t be good.”

It’s weird though.  It’s being sprayed right on the ears of ripening barley, and we’re going to eat it.  There’s poison on it , and we’re going to eat it.  We’re killing ourselves and enjoying it.

We don’t make the connection between our demand for cheap, convenient food and lifestyles and the consequential impairment of diet and lifestyle.  Our monolithic food chain, standardised automated production, controlled by capitalists is withering our soul and costing our health.  Apart from the increased incidence of cancer which only affects a third or so of us, almost everyone is affected by the lower quality of food – processed, refined, packaged with a fraction of the dietary health benefits of real food, but extra poison.

Yet we all buy in to it.  We all live the lie.  The farmer can’t make ends meet if he doesn’t.  (Ironically, I found out since that this “T3” third treatment for “disease” was being applied too late, as the ears were grown, and so wouldn’t improve yield, although the farmer could prove he sprayed the “treatment”.)   We can’t make ends meet f we don’t play the pyramid consumption game.  So we all turn a blind eye to our gradual suicide.  It’s fairly painless anyway.

But it could be different.  It would be different if we all chose differently.  It doesn’t have to be much at first, but even little thoughtful choices make a difference.  And they lead to bigger thoughtful choice.  And when everyone starts choosing differently, the world changes fast.  So whether you’re in the tractor, in the shop, regulating the chemical, making the chemical, or financing the chemical, don’t turn a blind eye.  Think, and choose to change a little.

Because dying can be easy or hard, and withering from poison is not easy.

Zen Adventure

Before we begin the story, a brief but heartfelt thanks to those of you who helped make this adventure happen, especially Dad and Mum, Pam, Richard, Noel, Daniele, Kelly, Rhadames, Clara, Kate, Christian.  THANK YOU!

The idea of getting the red car down to Malta had been passed around a few times, but no one seemed to have time.  Dad had said that he thought it might be good this year.   It could be shipped, so I looked in to that, but the idea of driving seemed more interesting.  It would mean I could stop to see a couple of friends on the way.

The idea of taking someone had been booted around.  Pam would be teaching so couldn’t come.  The boys were in school.  And I didn’t want to be slowed down.  I was aiming for a maximum of a week and had to be back by 20  May at the latest and would be tied up in the garden and with hay making till late summer.  So, if I was to go, I was leaning toward a solo drive.

When Dad visited with Romey and Anthony he confirmed he’d like to  have the car in the sun, so I started planning and by the weekend had decided to go, but not whether to go on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday …  On Monday, Pam encouraged me to take Richard, but I was reluctant.  At lunch I decided to take Richard – it might be the last chance for me and him to get to know each other a bit before he was gone for good … We would leave the following morning.

Just about to leave Noel’s workshop in January 2016 looking the best she’s done for years.

The preparations had started in earnest a few days before the off.  Padraig at Wesley James’ tracked and balanced the wheels.  Wesley warned me about play in the steering.  I said “That’s just how it is!”.  Wesley told me to “See Noel!” at least five times.  So I did.  Noel is a wizard who keeps the cars, trucks and tractors of many lucky folk around here running and looking good.  He had done an amazing job of “repainting” the car a year ago.  The paint job was beautiful but he also waxoyled the frame inside and out and re-welded a few of the more gaping holes.  (After picking it up last year, he demonstrated its roadworthiness by doing a few doughnuts on a country lane!)  The car wouldn’t have been ready without his magical touch.  On this occasion he gave the steering a clean bill of health but told me to replace the front driver side tyre.  We swapped it for the spare in the meantime. I’d look for tyres over the weekend. Continue reading Zen Adventure

Time is running out: Behind the curve on SDGs

SustainAblility and Globescan’s recent survey of progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals is not encouraging.

Progress on transition to sustainable development to date (% of experts)
Progress on transition to sustainable development to date (% of experts)

Over 500 experts contributed.  The consensus is that progress and attention is lagging the need for change.  If data is restricted to those with a decade or more of experience the picture is worse.

“Poor” progress on transition to sustainable development to date (% of experts)
“Poor” progress on transition to sustainable development to date (% of experts)

Progress is dominated by social entrepreneurs and NGOs while national governments’ and corporates’ performance is considered poor.

Contribution of organizations to progress on the SDGs (% of experts)
Contribution of organizations to progress on the SDGs (% of experts)

The lack of attention by governments and corporates is underpinned by their “clients” – voters and consumers – so clearly there remains among people generally a lack of awareness of the need and opportunity for system change.  People don’t perceive the dangers of failing commercial and social systems and the disintegration of Earth’s natural environment upon which we rely.

Perhaps this is not surprising.  Except for change agents and social entrepreneurs, people are not engaged with the problems of the world but instead stick to traditional mindsets and routines.  (The SDG’s themselves are fundamentally flawed in their promotion of growth, as opposed to working within natural laws and the capacity of the biosphere.) Continue reading Time is running out: Behind the curve on SDGs

The Silk Roads: Two and a half millennia telling us to stop fighting.

Book review:

The Silk Roads

A New History of the World
by Peter Frankopan

Yes please!

The title and the book’s intention, to offer a global perspective, were intriguing to me.  Though not a history fan, it is increasingly clear that it is no help to see history from your own perspective because it is blinkered, full of self-serving interpretation and fails to expose the reality of the past.  This book offers a big picture perspective.

Continue reading The Silk Roads: Two and a half millennia telling us to stop fighting.

The Cycle of Life, and Death.

This time of year has had special significance for millennia.

Why?

Because it is the end of the annual spiral to darkness and nature’s rebirth.  Solstice is a time of rejoicing because it means winter darkness is lifting, warmth will return,  and food will become available again.

New GrangeImagine you live 10,000 years ago, somewhere above latitude 45 or so, you would notice the lengthening of the days a couple of weeks after December solstice.  That meant you might survive.

Even 5,000 years ago communities had invested so much in understanding the solar cycle that farmers in the Boyne Valley, Ireland built New Grange, an 85 metre diameter stone  tomb, which has a light box which  illuminates a 19 metre long passage and chamber as the sun rises on solstice morning!  The solar bounce was important to their livelihoods.

No, this is not a morbid view.  It’s reality.  Facing reality gives truth to our lives. Continue reading The Cycle of Life, and Death.